Photographer For Hire

In between projects, I do experimental shots. In this photo, I was trying to do a fake out-of-the-freezer look. I used a matte acrylic top coat and glycerine based solution. I also played with a foil behind the glass and got the effect.

In between projects, I do experimental shots. In this photo, I was trying to do a fake out-of-the-freezer look. I used a matte acrylic top coat and glycerine based solution. I also played with a foil behind the glass and got the effect.

Just a few days ago, one of my students asked me what equipments will she need if she decides to open up a studio. She’s one of those students that is overflowing with interest. Her photo shows a lot of potentials. My answer was not something she expected. I encouraged her to shoot more and fill in more experience.

One of the basis on how a photographer computes for his fee is not only the cost of equipment, it’s also the time spent learning and all the straight out of the pocket cost organizing a shoot just to practice. All those time and money spent without anything coming back. Sometimes it even takes number of years before somebody hires you.

One time, I was shooting for a resort and the client rejected my shots. He wanted to get a better view. To add to the situation, the rejection was not politely delivered, it came with a sting. How I wish I can solve my dilemma with an L lens or the latest full frame in the market today. Maybe a top of the line Elinchrome or Profoto to get a better light.

Nope, they all didn’t matter. It was all me and the skills I developed along the years in getting it done. Of course, handling rejections came with all the experience along the way. At times, you’ll get a chance to work with clients that totally gels with your style. These are not the times where you learn a lot but it balances the difficult ones.

From the many years of struggling to make a steady stream of photography projects, a newbie photographer must know that just like any other business, marketing and sales plays a vital role. Even if you have mastered your craft and an output comparable to the best in the industry, if nobody knows you, nobody will hire you.

In between projects, find time to do some experimental shots. You’ll never know what the client would suddenly ask in the middle of the project. This is also a good time to experiment with your workflow and find out what works best with your equipments given a certain scenario. Maybe a trip to the local camera shop for additional equipment.

Speaking of which, Macy’s Camera Shop is having a crazy sale on Manfrotto products. I’m a Manfrotto fanatic. From my tripod, magic arm, super clamp, boom and other accessories, I use Manfrotto. Yes you pay more but nothing beats the built and the well-thought-of design and functionality of this brand.

Keep on shooting everyone! www.albertpedrosa.com

Text and photos by Albert Pedrosa

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