Solving The Problem Backwards

So after a month long battle against Lightroom’s mess and how it messed up my workflow and to the point of almost losing a client, I’m finally seeing the sunlight after a storm. I hope it stays this way but just like in a horror movie, the villains will always try to make a last scare.

One of my favorite tool in LR, the adjustment brush, has become more powerful in its CC release. Adobe added more sliders for more precise adjustment allowing you to edit images in LR in particular parts only. Just like masking in Photoshop. (Photo Credit: Congrats Edmund and Nica)

One of my favorite tool in LR, the adjustment brush, has become more powerful in its CC release. Adobe added more sliders for more precise adjustment allowing you to edit images in LR in particular parts only. Just like masking in Photoshop. (Photo Credit: Congrats Edmund and Nica)

After a numerous tense sessions with Adobe’s help desk and countless hours of frustration waiting for a best solution to remedy the problem, it turned out that the solution is not to solve it but to step backward and go back to where it was running error free. Continue reading “Solving The Problem Backwards” »

Adding Visual Impact To Your Shot

This photo was taken in one of my out of town projects. I didn't have any assistant at that time given the equipments that I normally carry with me. To direct the light from one direction, I used a gridded softbox. I allowed the ambient light to fill in some warm light and added space on top of my subject to bring in other elements in the composition.

This photo was taken in one of my out of town projects. I didn’t have any assistant at that time given the equipments that I normally carry with me. To direct the light from one direction, I used a gridded softbox. I allowed the ambient light to fill in some warm light and added space on top of my subject to bring in other elements in the composition.

When you test a new camera equipment, whether this is a lens or the camera body itself, you start shooting at random scenes. You check how the equipment performs and the feel of it. The photos you take during tests are often, if not, always goes to the trash. The photo lacks the appeal to be shared in social media or at least take a space in the memory card. Continue reading “Adding Visual Impact To Your Shot” »

What’s The Color Of The Ceiling?

It’s amusing to know that a photographer arriving in the venue would look up and asses the ceiling. Is it white? How high is it? Can I bounce the light? The client might not notice it or know his reason why he’s looking up but it is one important factor when shooting indoors.

In this photo of Wilson and Sheila, I wanted to to get a soft lighted high key effect so I bounced the light off the ceiling using a regular speedlite flash.

In this photo of Wilson and Sheila, I wanted to to get a soft lighted high key effect so I bounced the light off the ceiling using a regular speedlite flash.

When you talk about close door event, one of the major consideration is available light. It becomes worse for photographers when mood lighting is used in an event. This problem occurs because the lights were designed on how we see it thus it adds to the experience. However, what we can see is not the same as what the camera can see. Continue reading “What’s The Color Of The Ceiling?” »

Using Strobes In Broad Daylight

“Why would you use strobe lights in a well lighted environment?” I normally get this question when shooting outdoors. As if the sun is not bright enough to light the scene.

When I started shooting in studio, the objective is all about perfection. In a controlled environment, you get to control all the light that you see in the frame. The idea is to realize your imagination through your photos.

Gerard and Ann

I use strobes as an additional light using the sun as one of my lights. When composing your shot, you find the right elements to to fill in your frame and sometimes available light is not angled to use as main light. If this is the case, you can use your available light as your backlight or fill light adding artificial light as your main. Continue reading “Using Strobes In Broad Daylight” »